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August 15, 2004

Potential Chapter: The Calculus of Political Power

This PDF is a draft of a chapter that we are considering including in the book to address the widespread application of the notion of "scale-free networks" to social systems, which, while it is a powerful idea, ignores all the externalities that actually shape social decisions. Your comments are welcomed!

Posted by Mitch Ratcliffe at August 15, 2004 7:02 AM

Comments

"... statistical evidence and practical experience suggests densely networked societies create more and egalitarian opportunities for self-organizing solutions to social problems."

I'd guess this chapter will evolve into its own book as the author has packed a lot of big ideas in here. My initial impression would be to break the flow down with better subheadings and idiot-proof the geekspeak.

Overall the site and direction of the upcoming edition is beginning to have the feel of a precursor to a new Federalist Papers for a sociopolitical network revolution if you consider how cheap printing presses influenced early America.

Cool.

Posted by: Scott Fitchet at August 17, 2004 4:36 AM

Mitch / Joe ...

The TypeKey login doesn't seem to be working ..... "The site you're trying to comment on has not signed up for this feature. Please inform the site owner."

Also ... paragraph breaks don't seem to be displayed either (at least in the preview).

Scott

Posted by: Scott Fitchet at August 17, 2004 4:58 AM

Scott,

We missed a step in turning on TypeKey authentication. It should work now. As for paragraph breaks, I don't completely understand... none of the entries is longer than one paragraph.

Posted by: Jon Lebkowsky at August 17, 2004 5:05 AM

Just testing the TypeKey login.

Seems to work.

( the yes/no 'remember me' buttons are not remembering previous selections )

Posted by: figital [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 17, 2004 5:13 PM

Overall the site and direction of the upcoming edition is beginning to have the feel of a precursor to a new Federalist Papers for a sociopolitical network revolution if you consider how cheap printing presses influenced early America.

You took the words right out of my mouth. The rest of the book is nice, rah-rah stuff to me, but this chapter plus 4, 9, 10 start to sketch in the blueprint for "how to get there from here".

Somewhere along the way we have to see that earnestness & having truth on our side isn't enough & that mastering the math of networks will be a vital step in this restructuring & revitalization of democracy. These chapters go a long way towards demonstrating that. I'm very excited to see what comes next.

Tim

Posted by: Tim Keller at August 17, 2004 6:41 PM

Err, make that Chapter 3 not 4, Clay's classic Weblogs, Power Laws & Inequality essay. My bad.

Tim

Posted by: Tim Keller at August 17, 2004 6:51 PM

You're welcome to delete the TypeKey posts though it doesn't matter.

Consider putting the "potential chapter" in a Wiki format for community editing.

Posted by: Scott Fitchet at August 18, 2004 3:37 AM

"Somewhere along the way we have to see that earnestness & having truth on our side isn't enough & that mastering the math of networks will be a vital step in this restructuring & revitalization of democracy."

These words left me awe. Let me be the second person in this thread to say: "you took the words right out of my mouth."

I think that a networked approach to democracy does have serious potential but, as the article on the Swift vote veterans illustrated, this form is also susceptible to traditional democracy's nemesis: propaganda.

As a personal side note, I am currently recuperating from a Math/CS undergrad degree and I am on the hunt for a grad program that focuses on rigorous social network research. Thus far I have found programs at Carnegie Mellon and UC Irvine. Anyone else know of other similar programs?

Posted by: Seth Mallamo at October 5, 2004 6:33 AM

On the left bar the link to chapter 11 does not lead to the html page but directly to the pdf page.

Pietro

Posted by: Pietro at January 5, 2005 9:30 AM

moviepost.cok

Posted by: mocoo at January 2, 2008 8:14 PM

moviepost.cok

Posted by: mocoo at January 2, 2008 8:14 PM

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